Onboarding Customers to Increase Sales by Michael Synk

Recently, I spent a day with Joey Coleman. Joey is the author of Never Lose a Customer Again. Over the course of that day, he shared some ideas we have all heard, but regularly over look, when trying to increase sales.

There’s a basic theme to all of his advice.

“Create a great customer experience, not just in landing the customer and client, but also in the onboarding process, and continue it along the way. Do this with every customer, and you’ll increase your sales at least 25%.”

In his book, Joey outlines a process to follow to build an onboarding process for new customers. It will ensure they will never consider leaving. Without giving his secrets away (they are in his book so they aren’t all that secret; pick up the book), the main message is communicate, communicate, communicate. Do it in ways meaningful to the customer using all forms of communication. Think about using phone, email, snail mail, texts, video, and gifts. Use them in a coordinated way that connects the sales team to the customer care/service team in onboarding and communicating with the customer. Do it intentionally.

What happens is two things.

The customer readily and easily will do more business with you in more ways than the original one. Then, they’ll tell others and influence them to buy from you as well.

Joey is not saying to stop selling. Just make sure the experience of buying from you the first time is incredible, and continue that incredible experience as the customer continues to buy more and tell others about you.

All his advice lines up well with a couple of other books.

Selling Boldly by Alex Goldfayn, and my first book from way back when, The Cheers Model of Marketing: How to Create Customers as Loyal as Norm Peterson. Both advocate that customers that like you will influence others to buy from, and companies and their sales and service teams need to leverage that.

There’s another post relating to this topic, A Fresh Look at Operational Entanglement, and I’m working on another about Actual Value, Strategic Value, and Influential Value.

I have some copies of The Cheers Model of Marketing at my office, so send me and email if you are interested in getting one. I think I’m going to issue and updated version.